Andrew Henry

Religious studies PhD and YouTuber
Andrew Henry
Dr. Henry is an expert in religion, archaeology, and ancient history. He merges his experience in excavation with his passion for education as the founder of the religious studies YouTube channel Religion for Breakfast.
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PAST EVENTS

Excavating Ancient Religion

Wednesday, April 29th, 9-10am / 12-1pm ET

Religion scholar and former archaeological excavator Andrew Henry takes us on a journey into the past. We'll try to pinpoint the origins of religion and discuss the challenges of doing so.

Magic in the Ancient World: How the Greeks and Romans Used Spells to Curse, Love, and Heal

Saturdays, September 5th and 12th, 12-1pm PT / 3-4pm ET

In this two-session seminar, we’ll use archaeological evidence to understand the magical rituals the ancient Romans practiced. We'll examine our own modern notions about the differences between magic, science, and religion, and explore how our modern categories influence how we examine ancient evidence.

Magic in Antiquity: How the Greeks and Romans Used Spells to Curse, Love, and Heal

Saturdays, September 12th and 19th, 3-4pm PT / 6-7pm ET

In this two-session seminar, we’ll use archaeological evidence to understand the magical rituals the ancient Romans practiced. We'll examine our own modern notions about the differences between magic, science, and religion, and explore how our modern categories influence how we examine ancient evidence.

Magic in the Ancient World: How the Greeks & Romans Used Spells to Curse, Love, & Heal

Saturdays, September 12th and 19th, 3-4pm PT / 6-7pm ET

In this two-session seminar, we’ll use archaeological evidence to understand the magical rituals the ancient Romans practiced. We'll examine our own modern notions about the differences between magic, science, and religion, and explore how our modern categories influence how we examine ancient evidence.

Magic in the Ancient World: How the Greeks and Romans Used Spells to Curse, Love, & Heal

Tuesdays, Oct. 13th and 20th, 5-6pm PT / 8-9pm ET

In this two-session seminar, we’ll use archaeological evidence to understand the magical rituals the ancient Romans practiced. We'll examine our own modern notions about the differences between magic, science, and religion, and explore how our modern categories influence how we examine ancient evidence.

Magic in the Ancient World: How the Greeks and Romans Used Spells to Curse, Love, & Heal

Wednesdays, Nov. 4th and 11th, 5-6pm PT / 8-9pm ET

In this two-session seminar, we’ll use archaeological evidence to understand the magical rituals the ancient Romans practiced. We'll examine our own modern notions about the differences between magic, science, and religion, and explore how our modern categories influence how we examine ancient evidence.

Excavating the Bible: The Archaeology of the Biblical World

Sundays, November 29th, December 6th, 13th, & 20th, 10am-11am PT / 1pm-2pm ET

In this four-session seminar, we’ll examine the archaeology of the cultures that lived in the Near East from the Bronze Age to the Roman Period, especially the Canaanites, Israelites, and Philistines. By unearthing material and textual evidence, we’ll explore how scholars approach the study of ancient history, especially when archaeological evidence tells a different story than Biblical narratives.

Magic in the Ancient World: How the Greeks and Romans Used Spells to Curse, Love, & Heal

Saturdays, December 5th and 12th, 10-11am PT / 1-2pm ET

In this two-session seminar, we’ll use archaeological evidence to understand the magical rituals the ancient Romans practiced. We'll examine our own modern notions about the differences between magic, science, and religion, and explore how our modern categories influence how we examine ancient evidence.

Excavating the Bible: The Archaeology of the Biblical World

Sundays, Jan 3 - Jan 31, 10am-11am PT / 1pm-2pm ET

In this four-session seminar, we’ll examine the archaeology of the cultures that lived in the Near East from the Bronze Age to the Roman Period, especially the Canaanites, Israelites, and Philistines. By unearthing material and textual evidence, we’ll explore how scholars approach the study of ancient history, especially when archaeological evidence tells a different story than Biblical narratives.

Magic in the Ancient World: How the Greeks and Romans Used Spells to Curse, Love, and Heal

Sundays, Jan 24 & Jan 31, 8:30am-9:30am PT / 11:30am-12:30pm ET

In this two-session seminar, we’ll use archaeological evidence to understand the magical rituals the ancient Romans practiced. We'll examine our own modern notions about the differences between magic, science, and religion, and explore how our modern categories influence how we examine ancient evidence.

Excavating the Bible: The Archaeology of the Biblical World

Sundays & Mondays, Feb 7 - Feb 28, 10am-11am PT / 1pm-2pm ET

In this four-session seminar, we’ll examine the archaeology of the cultures that lived in the Near East from the Bronze Age to the Roman Period, especially the Canaanites, Israelites, and Philistines. By unearthing material and textual evidence, we’ll explore how scholars approach the study of ancient history, especially when archaeological evidence tells a different story than Biblical narratives.

Magic in the Ancient World: How the Greeks and Romans Used Spells to Curse, Love, and Heal

Saturdays, Mar 6 - Mar 27, 8:30am-9:30am PT / 11:30am-12:30pm ET

In this four-session seminar, we’ll use archaeological evidence to understand the magical rituals the ancient Romans practiced. We'll examine our own modern notions about the differences between magic, science, and religion, and explore how our modern categories influence how we examine ancient evidence.

Archaeology of the Hebrew Bible

Saturdays, Mar 6 - Mar 27, 10am-11am PT / 1pm-2pm ET

In this four-session seminar, we’ll examine the archaeology of the cultures that lived in the Near East from the Bronze Age to the Iron Age, especially the Canaanites, Israelites, and Philistines. By unearthing material and textual evidence, we’ll explore how scholars approach the study of ancient history, especially when archaeological evidence tells a different story than Biblical narratives.

Archaeology of the New Testament

Saturdays & Sundays, Apr 10 - Apr 18, 10am-11am PT / 1pm-2pm ET

What kind of world did John the Baptist, Jesus, and the Apostle Paul inhabit? In this four-session seminar, we’ll examine the archaeology of 2nd Temple Period Judaism as well as the world of the Roman Empire in which Christianity first emerged.

Magic in the Ancient World: How the Greeks and Romans Used Spells to Curse, Love, and Heal

Sundays, May 9 - Jun 6, 9am-10am PT / 12pm-1pm ET

In this four-session seminar, we’ll use archaeological evidence to understand the magical rituals the ancient Romans practiced. We'll examine our own modern notions about the differences between magic, science, and religion, and explore how our modern categories influence how we examine ancient evidence.

Bio

Dr. Andrew Henry is a scholar of religious studies and a YouTube content creator. Andrew’s academic background spans ancient history, archaeology, and religious studies. He specializes in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean world, focusing specifically on the archaeology of early Christianity in late antique Asia Minor and ancient Syria. He is a former archaeological excavator in Athens, Greece with the American School of Classical Studies and a research fellow at the Albright Institute of Archaeological Research in Jerusalem.

Over the past five years, he has worked on the forefront of online religious literacy education as the host and founder of the religious studies YouTube channel Religion for Breakfast. Religion for Breakfast approaches religion as an academic subject through the lens of sociology, anthropology, history, and cognitive science.


Reviews

"I loved this session. The speaker was at the top of his game - clearly intelligent, had expertise, great slides, knew what he wanted to get across, etc. He received excellent questions during the talk, and he handled them very well. EXCELLENT."

Speakeasy participant