Ilya Somin

Author, Law Professor, Cato Institute Scholar
Ilya Somin
Ilya Somin is Professor of Law at George Mason University. Ilya has published six books with academic publishers and served as a peer reviewer for multiple publishers in the US and Europe.
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Bio

Ilya Somin is a Professor of Law at George Mason University. His research focuses on constitutional law, property law, democratic theory, federalism, and migration rights. In addition to teaching and advancing his research, Ilya has accumulated years of experience in the academic publishing world. He has published six books with academic publishers, including some of the best-known ones: Oxford University Press, University of Chicago Press, Cambridge University Press, and Stanford University Press. He even published his undergraduate thesis with an academic press, though admittedly had no real idea what he was doing back then!


Ilya has also served as a peer reviewer for multiple publishers in both the US and Europe, including Oxford, Cambridge, and Chicago, and has extensive experience reviewing manuscripts and book proposals on behalf of publishers. He knows the elements that could lead to a favorable book deal recommendation from reviewers. This experience has given Ilya a chance to see the process of academic book publishing from the other side, and get a better sense of what works and what doesn't.

He is the author of “Free to Move: Foot Voting, Migration, and Political Freedom”(Oxford University Press, 2020), “Democracy and Political Ignorance: Why Smaller Government is Smarter (Stanford University Press, revised and expanded second edition, 2016), and “The Grasping Hand: Kelo v. City of New London and the Limits of Eminent Domain (University of Chicago Press, 2015, rev. paperback ed., 2016). Somin has also published articles in a variety of popular press outlets, including The Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, the New York Times Room for Debate website, CNN, The Atlantic, and USA Today. He is a regular contributor to the popular Volokh Conspiracy law and politics blog, now affiliated with Reason magazine.

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